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Thread: Upper body during corners?

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    Question Upper body during corners?


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    When I am doing corners and also looking at pictures of people doing corners, I notice the upper body seems to bend the other way after the hips. Is this normal or to be avoided? Have I got this muddled up with counter balancing is is it one in the same?


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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    Some tilt head, some tilt body others stay rigid. Some just over think things rather than just get out and enjoy the ride.

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    Keep low and lean body into corner.

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1888 View Post
    Some tilt head, some tilt body others stay rigid. Some just over think things rather than just get out and enjoy the ride.
    And some find that by thinking about their riding and discussing it with others they enjoy it a lot more.

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    There was a thread, with illustrations, quite recently which covered this.

    F@cked if I know which one, though . . .

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    A lot of people seem to hang their bum off the seat but keep their body upright. This is missing the point. The point of hanging off is not to make it easier to get your knee down to impress the birds at the bus stop, it's to keep the bike more upright so it doesn't ground out or go off the edge of the tyres at max lean. As such the old fella below is right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yorick View Post
    Keep low and lean body into corner.
    If you want to shift the combined CG of the bike so it leans less you need to hang everything towards the centre of the bend, in fact your upper body makes the most difference as it is furthest from the contact point of the tyre which determines the lean axis.

    That said, it's a racing technique and of no real relevance to road riding.

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomcat View Post
    A lot of people seem to hang their bum off the seat but keep their body upright. This is missing the point. The point of hanging off is not to make it easier to get your knee down to impress the birds at the bus stop, it's to keep the bike more upright so it doesn't ground out or go off the edge of the tyres at max lean. As such the old fella below is right.
    Woo hoo

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomcat View Post
    If you want to shift the combined CG of the bike so it leans less you need to hang everything towards the centre of the bend, in fact your upper body makes the most difference as it is furthest from the contact point of the tyre which determines the lean axis.

    That said, it's a racing technique and of no real relevance to road riding.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    NB photo shows a soon-to-be expat late for the ferry

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    Google "kiss the mirror" cornering body position.

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    Default Re: Upper body during corners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Flynn2 View Post
    When I am doing corners and also looking at pictures of people doing corners, I notice the upper body seems to bend the other way after the hips. Is this normal or to be avoided? Have I got this muddled up with counter balancing is is it one in the same?
    You are probably riding too tense.
    Probably easier to work out when you look at riders cornering on naked bikes. If you sit on your bike, on the side stand, wheels in line, engine off and hold the bars in position (you can bend, wrists etc) and try slowly pushing your left kneecap towards the front of the engine/cylinder block/radiator whilst keeping you right kneecap close to or dragging against the right side of the fuel tank. Without pulling the handlebars you should be able to return to your normal seating position by gently pushing up with your feet and twisting your hips back into position.
    Whilst it might not feel natural it should not feel uncomfortable.
    Others (above) will know more than me but I am sure this, and being able to flap your arms whilst leaning, are staple techniques for novice racers

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