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Thread: Falling over

  1. #46
    Should Get Out More Julian_Boolean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Falling over


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    Quote Originally Posted by The Spin Doctor View Post
    I managed it on a Huski 610TE Beautifully linear - more throttle, more out of line

    Probably had something to do with the fact that the knobbly on the back was more air than rubber!
    I've done it on quite a lot of bikes, mostly off road ones on dirt, the only ones I can remember rear wheel steering on tarmac are a 98 R1 and 2002 Husky SM610S, the R1 was easier than the Husky, but it was happening at least 50mph faster at Snetterton coming onto the back straight, best dirt bike I had for rear wheel steering was my DRZ400, but that was probably because of the smooth power and that I had it for 9 years so got very used to it.

  2. #47
    Should Get Out More Julian_Boolean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Spin Doctor View Post
    A modern tyre has so much grip you're unlikely to exceed it...

    ...the road surface, however, is another matter

    Seriously, it's one of the reasons I spend so much time working on quick changes of direction. You ARE unlikely to exceed the tyre's ability to get the bike to steer and point a different way and the trade off is less mid-corner lean which means if you do hit a slippery bit of surface, the reaction of the bike as it loses grip is less likely to be a violent one and you have a good chance of recovering.

    Some riders don't like it because they feel they are 'destabilising' the bike by quick steering... but if you think about it, if you steer hard enough to make the bike shimmy a bit, the front tyre has done exactly what you asked it to do. Others dislike it because big lean angles are the 'fun' bit of riding, apparently!

    So they default to slow steering inputs and lazy changes of direction... which means that to get round the bend you need steeper lean angles mid-corner... and you're at the mercy of the surface and the bike loses grip, recovery needs Marquez-like skills. I haven't got them. Don't ask how I know.
    That's interesting because on the road (not track) I'm going through corners as quick as I've ever done but not leaning over very far.
    Last edited by Julian_Boolean; 08-11-18 at 16:30. Reason: Spelling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julian_Boolean View Post
    I've done it on quite a lot of bikes, mostly off road ones on dirt, the only ones I can remember rear wheel steering on tarmac are a 98 R1 and 2002 Husky SM610S, the R1 was easier than the Husky, but it was happening at least 50mph faster at Snetterton coming onto the back straight, best dirt bike I had for rear wheel steering was my DRZ400, but that was probably because of the smooth power and that I had it for 9 years so got very used to it.
    I've never done enough off-roading for it to happen anything other than by accident

    The Huski was doing it at about 25 mph

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julian_Boolean View Post
    That's intersing because on the road (not track) I'm going through corners as quick as I've ever done but not leaning over very far.
    It's interesting because when we do the Ride Skills days at Brands, around 2/3rds of the group that take it out on track are usually trackday virgins... some of 'em would be riding round the local roundabout faster than they do round Clearways

    Maybe it's because a) the bike is only on its side on the roundabout for a couple of seconds, and b) because body position tends to be different on the track.

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    Should Get Out More Julian_Boolean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Falling over

    Quote Originally Posted by The Spin Doctor View Post
    I've never done enough off-roading for it to happen anything other than by accident

    The Huski was doing it at about 25 mph
    For some reason I find it easy and really enjoy doing it, I definitely go slower though, as I'm loosing traction all the time I'm going sideways, just to balance things out, I'm crap at wheelies, stoppies, jumps and have never got a knee down.

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    Default Re: Falling over

    Quote Originally Posted by The Spin Doctor View Post
    I managed it on a Huski 610TE Beautifully linear - more throttle, more out of line

    Probably had something to do with the fact that the knobbly on the back was more air than rubber!
    Knobblies on wet greasy roads are great fun. Linking up the green lanes with single track roads on my WR250 was great fun, all slow speed stuff but it really helped get you used to the bike moving around under you a bit.

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