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Thread: Making a box frame; joints; tool recommendation

  1. #16
    Should Get Out More Jody's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making a box frame; joints; tool recommendation


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    This is what I'm going with..

    It will have a top too, I just left that off to show the frame.

    Pocket holes (Assuming I can buy a jig today !) where the 'frame' joints, glued for extra support.



    Kitch pine board.jpg

  2. #17
    Should Get Out More Screwdriver's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making a box frame; joints; tool recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by Jody View Post
    This is what I'm going with..

    It will have a top too, I just left that off to show the frame.

    Pocket holes (Assuming I can buy a jig today !) where the 'frame' joints, glued for extra support.

    Kitch pine board.jpg
    Looks like you have fallen into the trap of inventing your own wheel. There's a reason no one would ever build a box like that, all those fiddly cutouts weaken the panel at exactly the point where stress is concentrated. You'll never make the perforations accurate enough to help (no matter how much glue you plaster around it.

    Best bet if you want a space frame is to build a simple box structure with your main supports, then simply clad with paneling which "box" it in to give it rigidity. There is no advantage to all of the cutouts, all I see are problems and potential points of failure. If you are going to place it in a virtual "perfect" environment, you might get away with it. In the real world where no box ever perfectly touches a perfect plane, you introduce twist and that will pop off the weakened tabs the first time you stand on it.

    High end F1 technology might use composite construction methods where load bearing systems can share duties but they are calculated to fail as a unit (built up to or down to the weakest link, no point having suspension components stronger than the chassis for example). In the real world you would ideally build a strong frame which on its own has the required strength to carry loads, then clad it with a box structure which gives it the rigidity to keep the frame in place.

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