TRC is primarily funded by ad revenue. If you like the content you find here, don't block the ads check them out instead. Thank you.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 19 of 19

Thread: Modern day Drz 400

  1. #16
    Should Get Out More Tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Where I want to be.
    Posts
    33,895
    Like
    1,627
    Liked 2,247 in 1,156 posts

    Default Re: Modern day Drz 400


    TRC is primarily funded by ad revenue. If you like
    the content you find here, don't block the ads check
    them out instead. Thank you.
    I don't think there will ever be a bike like the DRZ again, sadly. Carbs are out for emission laws and modern safety standards require fly by wire, ABS and increasingly traction control. The days of the simple old bike you could fix with two spanners and hairy string are gone. And the mindset that appreciates middleweight dualsport bikes seems to be absent as well. Yamaha's Tenere is probably the closest and that's a huge heavy 660. Below that there's almost nothing until you get to 250s. Don't even get me started on the elephantine fashion icons that today's "adventure" riders think are suitable for a bit of laning.

    I guess you could argue a case for Honda's CB500X, it's a middleweight "adventure" bike though how much of that is capability and how much is styling is another matter. At about £6K new it's a lot cheaper than a GS and not too much more than a 250. It's not exactly devoid of surplus technology, you'd need to change the tyres and exhaust and god help you if you drop it on the OE bodywork. But worth thinking about.

    Or there's the KTM 690 enduro of course, more offroad focused, less so on road. Proven and reliable too.

  2. #17
    Really Bored whysub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    In The Essex Countryside
    Posts
    3,511
    Like
    488
    Liked 250 in 136 posts
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Modern day Drz 400

    The Enfield Himalayan ticks many boxes as an Adventure bike, rather than a Dual Sport bike which I think the DRZ was.

    Still, it has lots of good reviews from riders all over the World ( and some riding around the World), and is well liked by its owners, many of which are now finding pleasure in riding off road for the first time.

  3. #18
    Should Get Out More couchcommando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9,285
    Like
    160
    Liked 3,744 in 1,676 posts

    Default Re: Modern day Drz 400

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomcat View Post
    Don't even get me started on the elephantine fashion icons that today's "adventure" riders think are suitable for a bit of laning.
    .
    Having used one for a bit of laning they are absolutely suitable, with the right tyres on they may not go down a lane as fast as a lightweight bike but they get down just the same, tbh a lightweight and in a lot of cases a competition bike going down lanes at a speed to make them enjoyable has been part of the problem. Then thereís the tarmac that links lanes together where the bigger bike excels. Not to mention massive tank range as well and comfort in the road bits.
    If you havenít tried one on proper tyres you should have a go theyíre better and more fun than you think 😀

  4. #19
    Should Get Out More Julian_Boolean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    1985
    Posts
    15,625
    Like
    1,157
    Liked 3,312 in 2,005 posts

    Default Re: Modern day Drz 400

    The problem for me with adventure style bikes is that if they get stuck, they're stuck, having dug and dragged a DRZ out of the mud a few times I really don't fancy doing it with any thing any heavier.

    If I were to get another trail bike I'c quite like something like a DT175 or TS185, both light and simple, but for trail riding in the UK you're probably better off with an electrically assisted mtb as you can ride it off road in more places.

    Sent from my SM-T560 using Tapatalk

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Go Back to Forum My Forum

TRC Affiliates - Help TRC make a small amount of commission