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Thread: Boat Shed Thread.

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    Should Get Out More Yambo's Avatar
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    Default Boat Shed Thread.


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    About 6 or 7 weeks ago I was asked by a Turkish friend to have a look at a boat he'd bought for his 10 year old son. It's an old boat, a very old fibreglass boat that has definitely seen better days. I had a quick look and told him that although it needed a fair bit of work, I thought it could be made good. However, July and August here are oppressively hot and working on boats in the open is not a good idea so I said I'd have a better look and come up with a plan in September.

    It's September so I had a look a couple of days ago and wasn't too impressed. The starboard side of the hull has had 3 fairly large holes and also a big crack repaired in the past and whoever done it didn't do that good a job. I can understand why, they have done 'enough' to get it back in the water but there's a lot of other work could have been done at the same time as those repairs and as they haven't been touched it means a lot more needs to be done.

    The hull is very thin and the top edge is rounded over to provide a bit more strength I guess. Bonded to that is a moulded fibreglass gunwale. This was fractured in a number of places. My original plan was to put a length of timber up inside the overhang of the gunwale to provide more strength but it had been so badly repaired that a single length of wood would be difficult to form and more than one piece would not provide the strength. Around most of the hull the joint where the gunwale should be stuck to the rounded over bit of hull was coming apart and it soon became apparent it wasn't bonded at all in a number of places. I levered a few sections off and told Özgur we needed a different plan.

    Today I sanded off paint etc in the areas of the old repairs to get an opinion on whether a good job was viable. We've decided it is and I should be able to do most of the jobs/improvements with excess stuff I have available. I've stopped building boats so I really should get rid of the timber and plywood I have lying around. I still have quite a bit of fibreglass spare as well so costs will be minimal. The boat was built with polyester resin as opposed to epoxy which is a good thing - polyester resin is less than a third the price of epoxy. Kamoron, the 10 year old is champing at the bit but to get this to where he can use it for a couple of years before upgrading is going to take a bit of time. The weather is still very warm and humid so work at the moment will be a couple of hours in the evenings - when I'm not out fishing.

    I took a couple of pictures today, not really 'before' pictures because I've already ripped some bits off but you'll get the gist. I'll take more as I progress and a couple more over the next couple of days to help explain the issues.



    You can maybe see the rounded over bit of the hull in this picture. I've ripped off the front section of gunwale.



    There was a piece of timber behind these holes, there to support the thole pins (the Turkish/Mediterranean equivalent of rowlocks). It was rotten. The nuts and bolts were originally 6mm steel - not good and most are now about 1mm in diameter. You can clearly see where the gunwale/hull joint is cracked. Around the hull there was more crack than bonded bits.



    You can see the line of the repaired crack in the hull quite easily. There doesn't appear to be a lot of fibreglass used, it looks mostly resin. I'll strengthen it with more fibreglass after sanding a fair bit of it away. You can also see one of the repaired holes which also need fibreglass patches on them. After that's done Ill fair those bits and then I'll sand the whole hull and coat it with 2 or 3 coats of epoxy barrier coat. That should do it.



    The port side of the hull not looking too bad. I've ripped off the front section of gunwale this side too.

    Welcome aboard!

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    Should Get Out More 1888's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boat Shed Thread.

    Slight off topic. The roof of my van has had a repair in the fibreglass roof. Rough looking fibreglass was used and its quite unsightly. I want to sand this back and paint before winter but its bloody sold and sand paper on a block wont touch it. Unsure if i should go near it with an electric sander.

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    Should Get Out More Yambo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boat Shed Thread.

    The rough looking fibreglass is probably chopped strand matting. It has its uses. I sand fibreglass regularly - I was sanding some today and you're right, it can be tough going by hand. I usually use a random orbital sander and may use 80 grit discs to start with but if you are just looking to prepare for painting, 150 or 180 grit should be fine. Run the sander on a slow speed if you can. The resin can heat up and will quickly clog up the sanding discs if the speed is too high. Van roofs are quite thin iirc so don't press hard, let the sander do the work and keep the plate flat. It would be very easy to go through the roof if you tilt the plate and use the edge of the disc. If you are going to use a basic orbital sander you might need coarser paper, they don't normally put a lot of effort in.

    What paint are you going to use? I'd go for a 2 part epoxy barrier coat personally.

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    Default Re: Boat Shed Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yambo View Post
    The rough looking fibreglass is probably chopped strand matting. It has its uses. I sand fibreglass regularly - I was sanding some today and you're right, it can be tough going by hand. I usually use a random orbital sander and may use 80 grit discs to start with but if you are just looking to prepare for painting, 150 or 180 grit should be fine. Run the sander on a slow speed if you can. The resin can heat up and will quickly clog up the sanding discs if the speed is too high. Van roofs are quite thin iirc so don't press hard, let the sander do the work and keep the plate flat. It would be very easy to go through the roof if you tilt the plate and use the edge of the disc. If you are going to use a basic orbital sander you might need coarser paper, they don't normally put a lot of effort in.

    What paint are you going to use? I'd go for a 2 part epoxy barrier coat personally.
    Cheers for that. My sander is an old hand held belt what may be a bit brutal so ill pop into B&Q and grab a wee orbital sander.

    Paint is just a company called Arc-Rite who do chassis paint in a satin black what i just roller on as its a rat van


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    Default Re: Boat Shed Thread.

    OOO a boat resto thread, sweet.

    I know precious little about boat repairs, so this will be quite interesting for me.

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