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Thread: Hands free mobile phones

  1. #16
    Should Get Out More nidge's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ant View Post
    A rev counter is very useful information.
    I notice you say A rev counter rather than THE revcounter....

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    Should Get Out More Horse's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by nidge View Post
    I notice you say “A” rev counter rather than THE revcounter....
    I wonder whether any of the forum pedants have ever suggested changing the name to 'The Tachometer'

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by Noggin View Post
    Is it much different to talking to a passenger?
    Yes.

    Because you can switch off from talking to a passenger when you're doing something demanding a lot of attention, and the passenger sitting next to you will respond by waiting to continue the conversation. Someone on the end of the phone can't do that.

    It's more nearly akin to trying to mediate a row between two kids in the backseat whilst driving.

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by slowsider View Post
    Not safe, but perhaps safer? At least there isn't that distracting scramble to hide it if you spot a cop . Maybe integrating them gives the impression of Doing Something.
    The physical impediment of holding the phone in your hand is not nearly so much of a problem as the 'workload' issue and this was being discussed when the handheld ban was enacted (too late to stop it having become a habit).

    As Horse also mentions, referencing a TRL paper, this has been of concern almost as long as handheld mobile phones have been around.

    I wrote a blog post on my website about this getting around 15 years ago when I discussed the 'theory of competing resource channels'. This theory proposes that rather than having a single 'central' processing resource, the brain instead uses several channels which compete for processing resources; visual, auditory, cognitive and psychomotor. Any task can be broken down into the demands it places on each of these resource channels.

    Generally speaking, we have enough mental resources to carry out the most demanding tasks in any one of these categories, or to carry out multiple but undemanding tasks that engage different channels.

    But...

    as soon as we're performing MORE than one task, and IF those tasks make demands on the same channels, the result is likely to be excess workload.

    For example, we can easily walk and chew gum at the same time because the tasks are undemanding and using different channels , but we cannot talk and listen at the same time.

    This model was applied to using a mobile phone and the results calculated was that the 'cognitive' element of workload exceeded the limit at all times when behind the wheel. (For the same reason, asking an inexperienced rider to make a verbal commentary on a ride may not be a good idea because it pushes the rider into 'workload overload' condition.)

    So... don't use a handheld, but don't use a hands-free either and think you can talk and drive (or ride, come to that) at the same time.

    My own phone is resolutely ignored if it rings whilst I'm driving.

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by iansoady View Post
    One of the problems with research is that people seem not to know that a previous study has been done. My work with clinical trials has shown that the level of reporting of results, and more specifically lay summaries which the ordinary person can understand, is woeful. So sometimes it's hardly surprising that large amounts of money are poured into trials and studies the answers to which are already known.
    Precisely what I've found researching the Science Of Being Seen (http://scienceofbeingseen.wordpress.com).

    Motorcycle conspicuity and countermeasures studies are scatter-gunned across dozens of journals, across at least forty five years. The earliest are no longer relevant as cars, bikes and the driving environment have changed.

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    There is no doubt that talking on a mobile phone significantly affects your motor skills. The part of the brain that deals with deciphering conversation, especially when the person is not present, seems to be the exact same bit that helps you steer straight and make down the road assessments!

    I have been as guilty as anyone else when it comes to sneaking a quick phone call in, or worse still checking a text!

    My worry is more related to motorcycle Bluetooth headsets that promote distracting conversation while riding. It is hard enough to keep focussed on situations which could lead to impending death, without a conversation going on!

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by BikerJo View Post
    There is no doubt that talking on a mobile phone significantly affects your motor skills. The part of the brain that deals with deciphering conversation, especially when the person is not present, seems to be the exact same bit that helps you steer straight and make down the road assessments!

    I have been as guilty as anyone else when it comes to sneaking a quick phone call in, or worse still checking a text!

    My worry is more related to motorcycle Bluetooth headsets that promote distracting conversation while riding. It is hard enough to keep focussed on situations which could lead to impending death, without a conversation going on!
    And that's why my comms when training is strictly one-way.

    I actually find it quite scary that so many basic trainers are now using the cheap Bluetooth systems to have two-way conversations when riding... they seem to be very blase about the risks.

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    Should Get Out More Horse's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by The Spin Doctor View Post
    And that's why my comms when training is strictly one-way.

    I actually find it quite scary that so many basic trainers are now using the cheap Bluetooth systems to have two-way conversations when riding... they seem to be very blase about the risks.
    Using radios is like any other communication, it requires thought and planning if to be successful.

    Part of that is keeping information clear and concise, but also correctly timed.

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Many many years ago when I was an AA patrol, we were encouraged (or even instructed) to use the radio while on the move. I always thought this was risky so insisted on pulling into the side of the road before answering or calling.

    "Romeo 5, Romeo 5, over"

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  13. #25
    Should Get Out More slowsider's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by iansoady View Post
    Many many years ago when I was an AA patrol, we were encouraged (or even instructed) to use the radio while on the move. I always thought this was risky so insisted on pulling into the side of the road before answering or calling.

    "Romeo 5, Romeo 5, over"
    "Broadsword calling Danny-boy"



    Someone had to

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    Default Re: Hands free mobile phones

    Quote Originally Posted by Horse View Post
    Using radios is like any other communication, it requires thought and planning if to be successful.

    Part of that is keeping information clear and concise, but also correctly timed.
    It was one of the toughest things to learn when I was gaining experience as a trainer. I'd say it was at least six months of full-time instructing before I really began to use the radio well, despite having prior training on the CSM instructor training course. And that learning about 'clear, concise and well-timed' was reinforced when I had to listen to an otherwise very good instructor suffering from motormouth syndrome as he succumbed to nerves during our DAS assessment at Cardington. I was screaming into my helmet "shut up shut up shut up".

    Expecting someone who is learning to ride a bike to be able to make any kind of meaningful commentary on what they are doing is not just misguided - it's ruddy dangerous.

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