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Thread: Laying a new floor

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    A Bit Bored Ace Llani's Avatar
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    Default Laying a new floor


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    My new (old) garage needs a new floor.

    There were railway sleepers laid out, and Id thought of over boarding them to make a flat floor, but when I started looking into it, the sleepers had gone rotten from below.

    The section I need to concrete is 16 x 12. Guess the concrete needs to be 4 thick, so to my guesstimate that would need about 2 cubic metres of concrete?

    The base is old cobble stones, so damp proof membrane would be needed. Thinking about putting board over the concrete afterwards, and possibly Lino for easy clean and warmth underfoot.

    So - guess I shutter sections off so I can make level - about 4 wide?

    Also, should I get readymix or get a mixer and mix as I go?

    Cheers,

    Rich.

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    A Bit Bored Ace Llani's Avatar
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    Should Get Out More demographic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laying a new floor

    Depends if you have access to a self levelling laser with beeping detector.

    Either way I'd put a damp proof membrane over the ground, possibly on sand blinding so you can walk over the top of the DPM without stones poking holes in it. If you can seal the joints as it lessons the amount of damp that can get through the slab, this isnt always easy and its never perfect but its worth a try all the same.
    Then I'd put thin as possible foam insulation (you can often get it in a roll about 150mm wide by maybe 10mm thick for this) in strips up against the walls, so the strips end just above the level of the concrete, this means the concrete slab has a bit of expansion space without pushing against the walls. You can cut it to the correct height after the concrete has set.

    The only bits I'd shutter is the doorways and I'd put the top of the timber to the needed height.

    If I had a laser, detector setup (I have) I'd use that to determine the levels whilst concreting, using the top of the doorway shutter as a datum height.



    If I didn't have one the way I saw the old labourers do it years ago was to cut 2x2 blocks maybe a foot long and the day before the concrete goes down they put little blobs of cement down and set the bits of 2x2 in it at various spots across the floor, these gave them a height to work to and when they got the concrete in they pulled the timbers out before it was all set. Then they could use a shovel of concrete to fill in the hole from where the timber was and float it all off.

    I am however, NO EXPERT ON CONCRETING, I have done quite a bit of shuttering on sewage works, bridges, walls and a few sets of steps and kind of milled about when its concrete day just making sure my shutters hold while the groundworkers finish the concrete, I occasionally drop the poker in and whatnot.
    I have buggerall idea about the times involved in finishing concrete, the correct mixes to use are also a mystery to me.

    Always have a place you don't mind spreading the excess concrete out on, you can break it up if its thin enough and fire it in the skip, its better to have a wheelbarrow too much than a shovelfull too little.

    Oh yeah, I got just over 1.78 metres of concrete once I'd converted it from cubits, chains and fathoms measuring system.
    Last edited by demographic; 25-03-20 at 07:21.

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    Should Get Out More Cousin Jack's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laying a new floor

    I have tried concreting, and my advice is to get a man in to do it. By all means clear out the site, put the DPM in, on sand as suggested, but my attempt at concreting was a disaster as far as levels were concerned. How difficult can it be to lay a slab about 3 foot by 20 foot so that the water runs off the long edge? The correct answer (as determined by experiment) is damn near impossible.

    I confess to being a numpty, but a numpty who had to live with the result until I moved house. Don't be a numpty.

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    Not Much To Do WelshDragon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Laying a new floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Cousin Jack View Post
    I have tried concreting, and my advice is to get a man in to do it. By all means clear out the site, put the DPM in, on sand as suggested, but my attempt at concreting was a disaster as far as levels were concerned. How difficult can it be to lay a slab about 3 foot by 20 foot so that the water runs off the long edge? The correct answer (as determined by experiment) is damn near impossible.

    I confess to being a numpty, but a numpty who had to live with the result until I moved house. Don't be a numpty.
    I concur. Its a real art. Had a new garage built last year. The concrete was delivered in a mixer, pushed around the garage by the 3 builders but then they left the levelling stuff to a geezer who had been doing it for decades. Concrete arrived at 9am and he was still working with it at 8pm that night! According to him the makeup of the concrete also dictates how long it takes to fart about with it! He did great slopes out of the 2 doors but even he struggled a bit with levelling it all.
    Some things I think you can do as a diyer, some you cannot. I think this is one of them to avoid.

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