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Thread: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?

  1. #16
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    Default Re: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ant View Post
    It's the other way around, should never notch at ends, in the middle for a pipe depth is fine. Outer edge has a depth cubed affect on load bearing.
    Some of that is right and your not supoosed to put the notch right against the ends but your also not suposed notch the centre.

    On the larger of the notches theres a distance from the ends its got to be greater than 0.07L of the joist and the notch can't end more than 0.25L into the length of the joist. Basically NOT notch the centre of the joist.
    The a hole in the centre of the joist depth is usually fine as its in the neutral stress zone but in the top or bottom notch shouldn't be in the centre of the length.


    The people doing this should actually know the restrictions but it sometimes comes down to me as a carpenter to replace joists after the gaffa has spotted that some numb plumber has fucked it up or just couldn't be trashed to get the angle drill out of the van and notches too muchout instead.

    Underfloor heating is making this trend worse.
    Last edited by demographic; 22-05-20 at 07:57. Reason: .

  2. #17
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    Default Re: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?

    We did a series of calculations in Mech.Eng (don't ask , it was a long time ago) on steel beams (same rules apply to wood etc) that show that the nearer to the longitudinal centre line there is reducing addition to strength to the point where the material at the centre adds nothing at all.
    This is why on long girders (think truck chassis) you will often see holes to lighten the member along the centre line.
    Hope that helps.

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    Default Re: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?

    Quote Originally Posted by davidat19 View Post
    We did a series of calculations in Mech.Eng (don't ask , it was a long time ago) on steel beams (same rules apply to wood etc) that show that the nearer to the longitudinal centre line there is reducing addition to strength to the point where the material at the centre adds nothing at all.
    This is why on long girders (think truck chassis) you will often see holes to lighten the member along the centre line.
    Hope that helps.
    I reckon we've strayed a bit off the placky or copper thing already but hell we're on a roll so... The centre of the depth and a hole in effectively the neutral axis being different in terms of strength than the centre of the length and a notch at the top or bottom.

    I've seen the girders with more or less hexagonal holes in them where they've been cut in more or less a truncated zigjag along the length of the web, then welded up as a deeper section. The flanges are ontouched and the girder loses a little length but its increase in depth makes it much stronger for the same weight.
    Personally I always preffered the hex hole ones to the rounds because it was more efficient to cut them that way but I've never seen load analysis to compare the relative strengths.
    More or less like the bottom on of this picture.

    Or like these which I've used on large shuttering/formwork jobs, think theyre called Strongbacks.
    Seen here holding the cabin section of a boat up while someone worked on the steel hull, I had buggerall to do with this, it was just at a place I was fitting a drawbridge to and I was interested.


    Incedentally, that was one of the best jobs Ive ever had, the engineer running our section was excellent, well informed, polite and really knew his stuff. Last I heard from him he was off ill long term with heart problems which was a shame cos I'd hapilly work for him again.

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    Default Re: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?

    I’ve spent the week replacing the bathroom, when I say bathroom, it is a shower room on one of the half landings with the original cloakroom in it.

    This week’s challenges / discoveries:


    1. The dolphin and seashell wall tiles took off the finish plaster on 80% of the cloakroom walls
    2. The browning on one wall wasn’t bonded to the brick/block work which filled 4 builders tubs once I got it off
    3. I’ve never been so grateful for a huge bag of packers when it came to battening out the cloakroom, the walls are so out of true and plumb
    4. 5mm ply and ring shanked nails are really good at holding 6x6 floor tiles down that a club hammer, bolster and sds tile chisel plus crow bar are needed to lift it (laid after sink pedestal and toilet were installed)
    5. Who on earth puts standard chipboard under / in front of a toilet (that has obviously been leaking at some point) ��
    6. The previous “tradesman” didn’t have or use a voltage detector pen as one cable (no conduit) had a hole through it but mysteriously didn’t trip the fuse box, there is an issue with a light fitting bit it doesn’t appear to be connected to the damaged (now repaired) cable
    7. Just because all visible plumbing fittings appear to be speedfit, there will be one buried at arms length under a floorboard that feels like speedfit but is polypipe fitting which foiled me when trying to fumble with it
    8. Packing out studwork with strips of plasterboard rather than full sheets may fool some people, but it doesn’t improve the intended fire rating (missing out the intumescent strips doesn’t help either)
    8a. The said packing strips were missing on the main wall of the shower to accommodate plastic wall cladding screwing up the trueness of the wall.
    9. Standard plasterboard isn’t very good behind a shoddily installed shower cubical
    10. More and more sealant doesn’t solve leaks
    11. Gripfil shouldn’t be used to seal a waste to a shower tray


    That’s what I can remember having to overcome this week.


    After 5 days of 8 hour days toiling in a south facing room with a massive window on the hottest week of the year sees the rooms gutted, shower mixer and outlets installed*, walls ready for plasterboard, floors screwed down and lined with no more ply, plenty of blood and sweat has been spilled and I’m ready to tile and crack on.


    Buy a Victorian townhouse they said, renovate it themselves they said, it’d be fun they thought...


    ��


    Ps how can I get dried polyurethane glue from my hands. ��

    * all in pex as I couldn’t be arsed making joints at arm’s length under a floorboard

  5. #20
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    Default Re: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?

    Quote Originally Posted by Silly Car View Post
    I’ve spent the week replacing the bathroom, when I say bathroom, it is a shower room on one of the half landings with the original cloakroom in it.

    This week’s challenges / discoveries:


    1. The dolphin and seashell wall tiles took off the finish plaster on 80% of the cloakroom walls
    2. The browning on one wall wasn’t bonded to the brick/block work which filled 4 builders tubs once I got it off
    3. I’ve never been so grateful for a huge bag of packers when it came to battening out the cloakroom, the walls are so out of true and plumb
    4. 5mm ply and ring shanked nails are really good at holding 6x6 floor tiles down that a club hammer, bolster and sds tile chisel plus crow bar are needed to lift it (laid after sink pedestal and toilet were installed)
    5. Who on earth puts standard chipboard under / in front of a toilet (that has obviously been leaking at some point) ��
    6. The previous “tradesman” didn’t have or use a voltage detector pen as one cable (no conduit) had a hole through it but mysteriously didn’t trip the fuse box, there is an issue with a light fitting bit it doesn’t appear to be connected to the damaged (now repaired) cable
    7. Just because all visible plumbing fittings appear to be speedfit, there will be one buried at arms length under a floorboard that feels like speedfit but is polypipe fitting which foiled me when trying to fumble with it
    8. Packing out studwork with strips of plasterboard rather than full sheets may fool some people, but it doesn’t improve the intended fire rating (missing out the intumescent strips doesn’t help either)
    8a. The said packing strips were missing on the main wall of the shower to accommodate plastic wall cladding screwing up the trueness of the wall.
    9. Standard plasterboard isn’t very good behind a shoddily installed shower cubical
    10. More and more sealant doesn’t solve leaks
    11. Gripfil shouldn’t be used to seal a waste to a shower tray


    That’s what I can remember having to overcome this week.


    After 5 days of 8 hour days toiling in a south facing room with a massive window on the hottest week of the year sees the rooms gutted, shower mixer and outlets installed*, walls ready for plasterboard, floors screwed down and lined with no more ply, plenty of blood and sweat has been spilled and I’m ready to tile and crack on.


    Buy a Victorian townhouse they said, renovate it themselves they said, it’d be fun they thought...


    ��


    Ps how can I get dried polyurethane glue from my hands. ��

    * all in pex as I couldn’t be arsed making joints at arm’s length under a floorboard
    Dried PU glue?
    Just wait til it wears off, couple of days.

    Orrible innit?

  6. #21
    Should Get Out More Silly Car's Avatar
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    Default Re: Plumbing in shower - pex or copper?

    Quote Originally Posted by demographic View Post
    Dried PU glue?
    Just wait til it wears off, couple of days.

    Orrible innit?
    Yep, been using something called STS Mega Strength Adhesive to stick the no more ply (cement boards) down which allegedly gives a good surface for tiling, possibly waterproofs the floor (assuming it is sealed all round), and saves a fair few mm which compared to plylining.

    I did consider the supplied plastic gloves or getting some latex ones out of the shed, but I’d been up and down the stairs 1,000 times already...

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