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Thread: So how long should we let her suffer?

  1. #16
    Should Get Out More demographic's Avatar
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    Default Re: So how long should we let her suffer?


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    I much prefer farm vets to more pet based vets.
    Farm vets in my experience are far more likely to look you in the eye and give you the "It's about quality of life, not the quantity" talk.
    Again, in my experience the ones who deal with pets all the time try to milk the owners for every penny they can.
    Holistic fucking specialist? FFS change vets.

    Its a total bastard when it comes and we kept our Border Collie going too long but at least he still enjoyed his walks almost to the end but it was a quality of life call.

    Sorry to say it but put it out of its misery.

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    Default Re: So how long should we let her suffer?

    I think you've answered your question yourself, in the thread title. Don't. More specifically - don't MAKE her suffer, beyond the point where it's clear that she isn't going to improve, and her life is no longer enjoyable FOR HER. I'm assumimg that Tramadol is a " last resort", having tried the more usual drugs e.g. Rimadyl, Metacam etc. unsuccessfully, otherwise you wouldn't be on here. You mention 2 things that bother me, tho I don't know the details, obv, any more than anyone else on here. 1) antibiotics - what for? If she has an infecton of some sort - OK. If not, she should not be on them. A basic principle. 2) "Holistic specialist"? At this point, words fail me. Sorry to piut it like this, and maybe I shouldn't, but... look him/her in the eye and ask "what exactly is one of those then?"

    I used to use a couple of questions, delivered gently of course. Something like - "Has today been a good day for her? What about yesterday? What do you think tomorrow will be like for her?" Note the emphasis on "her". Vets have a precious privilege, in this type of situation, in being able to let an old friend off a difficult "hook" gently - not available in the human field (different topic). Often owners need to be helped to understand that the big problem is that they can't bear to make a final decision, but the welfare of their pet needs priority over ther own grief. Easily said.....

    It sounds like you've already got there, but your wife hasn't, and that's not easy. "The happy part of her life is past, and the bit that's left is the miserable, painful bit that she shouldn't have to endure". There's a gentle way out.

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    Default Re: So how long should we let her suffer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wossname View Post
    "Holistic specialist"? At this point, words fail me. Sorry to piut it like this, and maybe I shouldn't, but... look him/her in the eye and ask "what exactly is one of those then?"
    I used to think that until I actually gave one a try. Acupuncture made a huge difference to my dog's mobility issues and allowed her to come off Metacam. A friend who's Staffie had the same symptons made the suggestion as it had been very successful for his dog.

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    Default Re: So how long should we let her suffer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoonercat View Post
    I used to think that until I actually gave one a try. Acupuncture made a huge difference to my dog's mobility issues and allowed her to come off Metacam. A friend who's Staffie had the same symptons made the suggestion as it had been very successful for his dog.
    I donít think Acupuncture is holistic medicine tho. Itís a well recognised medical practice.

    Iíll be honest, I had a skim through this https://patient.info/doctor/holistic-medicine and Iím still none the wiser.

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    Default Re: So how long should we let her suffer?

    Quote Originally Posted by scotsrich View Post
    I don’t think Acupuncture is holistic medicine tho. It’s a well recognised medical practice.

    I’ll be honest, I had a skim through this https://patient.info/doctor/holistic-medicine and I’m still none the wiser.
    From your link
    Nutrition, exercise, homeopathy, prayer, acupuncture and meditation are just a few other treatments that may be used together with conventional medicine as part of an holistic approach.
    I don't think prayer and meditation would be of any use in this case though

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  8. #21
    Should Get Out More hawker's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: So how long should we let her suffer?

    Can I chuck in some possible evidence for acupuncture? This evidence comes from work with amputees suffering phantom pain in the amputated arm. The amputee was sat at a desk with a mirror down the centre so they could see their remaining arm in the reflection appearing to be in the position where the lost arm would have been. The researchers were trying to test sensation in different parts of the body with ice-packs. When the patient had the ice put to their face they said they could feel it in the phantom limb and not just on their face. The convincing bit was when linked to brain scans, touching the face lit up connections within the brain between the facial sensory area and the rain-region. dealing with the missing limb's sensation. A clear physical link was demonstrated in the brain between the nerves of the face and the relevant arm. This was repeatable work and fairly consistent. It struck me immediately that perhaps needles in one part of the body, the face in this example could trigger a reaction in somewhere else. i.e. acupuncture could work this way. Due to specific links in the brain's network connecting specific different regions. A lot of research would be need to cover the whole body to identify links but I would suggest it would be worthwhile research.
    One question is why needles could cause pain relief at all? One way would be through triggering the release of endorphins, the body's natural painkiller being a type of opiate. Another way is why we scratch an itch? = Counter-irritation for which in acupuncture, after which the brain only notices the gentler sensation of the needles not the greater issue of the deeper pain. But the supposed operations done under just acupuncture take a lot of explaining. For example, pinning a fractured shin-bone. One thought is that the filming of this procedure as sown was faked and extra drugs were given apart from just acupuncture.
    For the OP-case, and arthritis I would expect it to be a counter-irritation, like rubbing a sore joint or whatever?
    I have had acupuncture for rheumatoid arthritis trying to reduce medications and it did not help at all!
    But whichever way you look at it, acupuncture justifies detailed research I believe. Does it work? Then how does it work?
    For how long does it work? How versatile is it instead of chemical anaesthesia being just some of the questions...

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